Street trading licences (general and special event)

Street trading policy

Read our street trading policy which came into force on 1 April 2016 and was updated in September 2018.

Street trading policy consultation 

We are consulting on some proposed changes to our street trading policy which came into force on 1 September 2018. Following the introduction of the policy, a number of issues have arisen in the interpretation and implementation of the policy. These proposed changes are designed to address these issues and increase clarity for those applying for street trading consents and/or organising special events. 

We would very much like your views on these proposed changes, which has been approved by the Lichfield District Council’s regulatory and licensing committee. 

What are street trading regulations?

Street trading regulations aim to ensure the safety of trading on the streets – both one-off traders and special events, such as Lichfield Food Festival and the Lichfield Festival Market. Street trading consents can apply to both public land and private land (provided the landowner gives permission for the land to be used for an event).

How do they make trading safer?

They open up positive communication between our expert environmental health team and street traders/events organisers. This dialogue can lead to the input of all relevant agencies to ensure events run safely and smoothly – from police and fire through to highways and more.

On a practical level, as part of applying for consent, traders must provide information about their public liability insurance, food safety certificates and more, so we can be sure that each business selling on the street has public safety at the heart of all they do. In addition, once given consent, checks are carried out by our environmental health team to ensure traders are operating safely.

Where does street trading apply?

All streets in the district are consented (apart from the A38), so street trading applies on all streets. This also applies to publicly used privately owned streets (for example Lichfield Cathedral Close, Minster Pool Walk and Bakers Lane in Three Spires Shopping). If someone wants to trade on privately owned land, they will first need to get the landowners consent.

What is a prohibited street?

Prohibited streets are where trading is not permitted. The only street in the district where street trading is prohibited is the A38.

Are parks and churchyards affected?

No, parks such as Beacon Park, are not a street as such so they are not affected by street trading legislation. Churchyards are also not considered streets.

What are the benefits of street trading consent?

  • We help to ensure the safety of events.
  • All traders are checked and signed off.
  • Organisers get access to environmental health professionals to ensure events are run safely – right from the start of the event planning process.
  • The risk on event organisers is lessened and they are more protected.
  • Lichfield District maintains its reputation as a safe place to visit.
  • Environmental health officers can advice on safe stall layouts.
  • Environmental health offers will attend events to ensure they are being run safely.
  • We, and the event organiser can prove that the event has been well planned and managed in case of an incident.
  • Enforcement powers can be used to eradicate unsafe practice.

Trading on private streets

There are a number of privately owned publicly used streets in the district. These include Bakers Lane in Three Spires Shopping Centre, Minster Pool Walk and the Lichfield Cathedral Close. In order to trade on these streets you will first need to get the landowner's permission, and then apply for a street trading license.

About market charters & street trading

Market charters override street trading legislation, so where one exists, street trading does not apply. Market charters are usually quite specific to day, time, location and radius. If a market charter does not exist, a street trading licence will be required before street trading is permitted.

Find out more

To find out more about the cost of licences, how to apply and more, visit our page about applying for street trading licences.